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Urgent funding needed!

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Hello all,

We hope you enjoyed your Christmas and New Year!

 

Here at Mirror, we are feverishly preparing for Children's Day, which is held next Saturday (12th January). This event is held annually, and we invite all the hilltribe children in the surrounding villages to attend - in the last few years, this has consistently been over 2,500 children (not including parents, villagers, staff, volunteers, local government officials, etc etc).

We provide the children with a free meal, lots of games to play (and win prizes), bouncy castle, roundabout, and many other fun activities.

But this all costs money, which we must raise. We estimate that this year the food bill will run at 100,000B, of which we currently have 30,000B

 

We need your help to raise the additional 70,000B...

and we only have 7 days to do it!

 

Please donate via Paypal button, or make a pledge via email

 

We can answer any questions you may have, but speed is of the essence!

Children's Day links:

 

PayPal donation

 

Main website

 

YouTube videoYouTube video

Last Updated on Friday, 04 January 2013 11:36
 

Loy Krathong Festival

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The history of Loi Krathong Festival

loy-krathong-2Loi Krathong festival is an ancient Thai tradition, which is takes place on the evening of the full moon of the 12th month (usually November). It is a very beautiful scene, with the full moon shining down on the river, perfect for floating Krathong. Loi (ลอย) means 'to float', and Krathong (กระทง) is the item which is floated down the river (see further).

In the past, lanterns were floated as part of Brahmanism, to worship the Gods; Siva, Vishnu, and Brahma. When Thai people adopted Buddhism, they adapted this ceremony in reverence to the goddess of the Mae Khong river (Mekong).

Floating Krathong along the river was allegedly created by Nang Noppamas; the favourite concubine of a Sukhothai King (Loethai). She made Krathong lotus-shaped, and gave it to the king of Sukhothai to float along the river. According to Sri Chula Lucks treatise, Phra Ruang (a Sukhothai King) said, 'From now on, on the full moon night of the twelfth lunar month, kings of Siam have to make a lotus-shaped floating lantern, to worship for ever after'.

In Rattanakosin period, people often made big and beautiful Krathong. According to Chao Phraya Dhipharachawong's historical annals:

In the twelfth lunar month on 14 and 15 waxing moon, I ask for members of the royal family and civil servants to make big-sized Krathongs, look like banana trunk rafts, sized 8-9 sauk in width (an ancient Thai measure of length) and 10-11 sauk tall. Competitions developed: For example, some imitate Krathong shaped as Mount Meru, while others made Krathong as baskets decorated with flowers. There are a lot of people to do these so they use a lot of money- about 20 chung (an ancient measure of weight).

Nowadays, Loi Krathong festival is held mostly in the Thai provinces. Particularly Chiang Mai, and Chiang Rai - there are Krathong parades, contests for making the best Krathong, and Noppamas beauty pageants.

The villagers in northern and north-eastern parts of Thailand also often send lanterns rising into the sky, made of coloured paper, to float across the heavens at night. The light from lanterns, with moonshine and stars glittering, can be seen for miles, and is very beautiful.


Reasons for Loi Krathong

loy-krathong-6

  • To ask for forgiveness from Pra Mae Khongkha (Goddess of the River Mae Khong) because we use and drink her water. Moreover, we often throw rubbish and other waste in the water.
  • To worship the footprint of Buddha on the shore of Nammathanati River, in India.
  • To get rid of misfortune, and sin - Bhraman ceremony.

Present day Loi Krathong

loy-krathong-1To this day, Thai people still keep the traditions - on the full moon of the twelfth lunar month, people prepare natural materials to make Krathong. They use sections of banana tree trunk, and lotus flowers to make beautiful Krathong, adding candles, incense sticks, and sometimes coins. They always ask for good luck in the future and forgiveness from Pra Mae Khongkha.

At the Buddhist temples and tourist places, they hold the contests for making Krathong, and Noppamas beauty pageants. There are many entertainment shows at night, and fireworks are let off constantly. Due to the use of natural materials, the Krathong easily decomposes, becoming food for the fish in the river.


Loy Krathong song (Translated)

November full moon shines,

Loy Krathong, Loy Krathong,

and the water's high in the river and local klong,

Loy Loy Krathong, Loy Loy Krathong,

Loy Krathong is here and everybody's full of cheer,

We're together at the klong,

Each one with his krathong,

As we push away we pray,

We can see a better day.


How to make Krathong

Methods to make Krathong from banana leaves

The head of Krathong shall use a section of soft stem cut from a banana tree trunk, in round shape approx. 1-2.5” thick, covered with intricately folded banana leaves.

loy-krathong-3Method 1: Petal Blossom

  • Cut banana leaves to approx. 1.5” wide and 6” long
  • Fold 3 petals according the illustrated picture
  • Arranged as terraced lines according to the illustrated picture (see right)
  • Attach around the Krathong base - the number of petals depends on the size of the base
  • Decorate with flowers, joss sticks and candle.

Folding of petals in this pattern can be used jointly with other folding patterns in the same piece as desired.

loy-krathong-4Method 2: Rose Petal

  • Cut banana leaves to approx. 1.5” wide and 6” long
  • Fold 3 rose petals according to the second illustration, and arrange in rows as desired. The top of the petals and beds should be in the same line to give it a beautiful and orderly look.
  • Use green or black thread to sew in straight line.
  • Fold banana leaves and sew enough to cover around the Krathong base, attach to the base with pins, and then trim to the same level of the base. The finished Krathong should look like a crown
  • Decorate with flowers, joss sticks and candle.

Folding of petals in this pattern can be used jointly with other folding patterns in the same piece as desired.

loy-krathong-5Method 3: Axe

  • Cut banana leaves to approx. 1.5” wide and 6” long
  • Fold 3 petals according to the illustrated picture and arrange in the same line with appropriate span. It is recommended to fold all the same size for a beautiful and orderly look.
  • Use green or black thread to sew in straight line.
  • Fold banana leaves and sew enough to cover around the Krathong base, attach to the base with pins, and then trim to the same level of the base. The finished Krathong should look like a basin
  • Decorate with flowers, incense sticks and candle.

Folding of petals in this pattern can be used jointly with other folding patterns in the same piece as desired.

 

Children's Day 2013

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TMF_5344Children's Day, a national holiday in Thailand, is a major event with activities taking place all over the country. It is a celebration of children, and is akin to a massive birthday party for all the kids in Thailand.

However, not all children in Thailand benefit from this day - or any other day during the year - because of poverty, abuse, exploitation, or lack of opportunity.

The Mirror Foundation, whilst working every day to improve the lot of children from ethnic minorities in the region, run a big party for Children's Day, based at our foundation outside Chiang Rai. Each child gets to play a variety of gams and activities (never less than a dozen), gets a free lunch, free drinks and ice cream, small prizes and snacks, and a main present at the end of the party.

We regularly host over 2,500 hilltribe youngsters, accompanied by parents, and mingling with staff, volunteers, interns, donors, local dignitaries, and media. It usually means we have 5,000 or more people on our 7 rai site (approx 2.5 acres). The foundation spends months organising the event, as many important aspects must be managed well in advance. We look for sponsorship for the food and drinks, donations of presents, helpers to run booths, and much more.

All of the organising, especially in the final week leading up to the day, takes a lot of manpower - teams of Mirror staff, volunteers (Thai and international), and our scholarship students, all help to prepare the presents, booths, food, and area. Without their help, it would never happen!

What we always struggle to find each year, is the funding to make this happen. Often we have to use money from our main budget to cover costs, despite all the donations and free help.

If you are in a position to donate, or could pass this message on - via Facebook, Twitter, email, or any other means, we would be very grateful.

Monetary donations can be made via the link on the left side of the main website page, but if there are any other forms of donation or help, please contact us via This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

 

Thank you Cool

 email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

main web: themirrorfoundation.org

106 Moo1 Ban Huay Khom, T Mae Yao, A Muang, Chiang Rai 57100 Thailand | tel: +66 (0)53 737616

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Last Updated on Friday, 05 October 2012 13:35
 

Mirror Foundation - Disaster Management Project

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P1060067Part of the outcome of Mirror's involvement in the flooding that has rocked Thailand for the last few months, is the development of a new strategy to deal with this type of natural disaster. Although it is a work in progress, the basic structure is already set and the fine details will worked through as time goes on.

Mirror set up its own 'Flood Relief Operations Centre' at Don Mueang airport, supprting the government efforts to respond to the crisis. Part of that work has involved following up initial calls to the government disaster hotline, sending out teams to evacuate residents, and connecting directly with communities by sending out mobile phones (donated by members of the public, or bought with donated money).

To put the flooding into some sort of perspective, you need to be a little overwhelmed by numbers, bearing in mind that these are taken from 19th October and that the flooding is far from over. Also, what needs to be remembered is that problems do not miraculously disappear when the waters leave - houses, shops, schools, hospitals, govt buildings... all these need cleaning and renovating, stocks need to be replenished, insurance claims must be met to cover bills, and much more. None of that is any more important than the human cost that this disaster has created - nearly 400 dead in Thailand already, the emotional stress and strain put on individuals and their families, workers and bosses alike wondering whether they stil have a job to go back to...

Last Updated on Friday, 05 October 2012 13:35 Read more...
 

Welcome to The Mirror Foundation

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The Mirror Foundation is a Thai Non-Governmental Organisation, run by Thai and hilltribe staff, working for the social development of the community in general, and for the benefit of ethnic minorities in particular.

Projects include working to secure citizenship for stateless persons, preventing exploitation and abuse of vulnerable individuals, strengthening the traditions and heritage of minority groups, and improving social conditions through empowerment.

A full list of projects, present and past, can be found by clicking here.

Last Updated on Friday, 05 October 2012 13:35
 


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